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MSD Walkout Memorial

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Model UN: lesser-known club

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    Fans of debate and critical thinking, or anyone else with a passion for politics, should take a look at Park Vista’s Model United Nations club. Supervised by Mrs. Breckon, the club meets to discuss international issues from a variety of different global viewpoints. Each student will take on the role of a different country within the United Nations to research and represent the country’s perspective.

 

    The club’s goal is to come up with resolutions, which are written documents that propose how issues should be addressed to accommodate all nations involved. Some of the topics the club will discuss are women’s rights, water quality and accessibility and refugees.

 

    “Our students have a vision and I feel grateful to be apart of it”, said Mrs. Breckon, “Students can see and understand perspectives other than their own.”

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Mayor for a Day

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Boynton Beach Mayor, Steven Grant

Boynton Beach Mayor, Steven Grant

Boynton Beach Mayor, Steven Grant

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On April 10, 2018, winners of the ‘Mayor for a Day’ essay contest, Jakob Ocasio, Brianna McKnight and Lexi Rando met Boynton Beach Mayor, Steven Grant, at City Hall. They received a guided tour led by Mayor Grant and learned about the inner workings of local government. In order to receive this amazing opportunity, the winners had to submit applications and essays as to why they feel they should be “Mayor for a Day” and their feelings and interests on local government systems.

Director of Public Works, Jeffrey Livergood, alongside City Engineer, Gary Dunmyer told the winners all about what certain areas of Public Works is responsible for and how after 2017 Hurricane Irma, solid waste employees were on the streets working to remove debris in order to get the lives of residents back to normal as soon as possible. The students stopped by the Parks and Recreation Center which included a tour of a new workout room and information as to how the department provides services to the city. They loved seeing the Senior Center and all the activities they have there such as singing lessons, yoga, ‘Pickle Ball’ (which is a combination of tennis and ping-pong) and more.

They visited some of Boynton Beach’s historic buildings including the Boynton Beach Schoolhouse, which originally opened in 1913, and is now a museum. They then were taken to the water treatment plant and able to ask questions and speak to some employees there.

Ocasio said, “The Mayor for a Day opportunity was eye-opening and demonstrated the actual political and bureaucratic nuances of our local community, Boynton Beach. It opened many opportunities and career paths to keep in mind during our transitions from high school to the real world.”

The students were able to attend the Quarterly Police Awards and learn about the duties and jobs of the men and women that work there. Eventually, Ocasio, McKnight and Rando will host their own public panel to discuss everything they learned during this honorable experience.

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Matyskiel’s history

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Matyskiel prepared to deal a dose of history.

Matyskiel prepared to deal a dose of history.

Matyskiel prepared to deal a dose of history.

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Matyskiel is more than meets the eye. Some students see teachers as boring people that enjoy torturing students with pounds homework. This may be true in some cases, but not Matyskiel’s.

With four other siblings, including an identical twin sister, Matyskiel did not have a normal childhood. Out of all her siblings, she is closest with her twin, and still talks to her often. Matyskiel says they used to pull pranks on each other and their other siblings.  “April Fools is a sacred day for identical twins,” said Matyskiel. She and her twin made a little extra money in college by participating in the Indiana University/University of Minnesota Twin Experiments, a study that looked into the genetic traits of identical twins and disease research.

Matyskiel teaches AICE International History and AP European History, and came to Park Vista as history department chair. She said, “If you get a job in history, you either die in that position or retire in that position.”

However, she did not always want to be a history teacher. She aspired to reform the judicial system by making things more consistent, and getting more justice for child abuse and rape victims. Matyskiel also wanted to become a judge because she liked the idea of facilitating trials over performing in them like a lawyer would. In her senior year in college, she went with her fallback plan of becoming an educator. “I think I would have burnt out too quickly,” said Matyskiel.

She is deeply involved in the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). The DAR is an organization that works with veterans, education, and historic preservation. “We do everything,” said Matyskiel. She had her children involved in the Children of the American Revolution (CAR), and Matyskiel has been senior leader since 2010. She is a member of the Lighthouse Point Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution out of Broward. Not just anyone can join though. In order to join, you need to be able to trace back a relative that fought or aided in the American Revolution. In her case, she is related to soldiers John and Robert Howard from South Carolina. The DAR works closely with veterans, a group of people who Matyskiel is very inclined to work with. “A veteran is a very special person who volunteers their life for the armed services,” said Matyskiel. The DAR recently donated half a million dollars to World War II memorials.

Matyskiel plans to leave the position of head of the CAR soon, but that does not mean she will be any less involved and devoted to the DAR. In the future, Matyskiel hopes she will have grandchildren. She says she has at least 10 more years of teaching in her, but when she does retire, she would like to do some traveling.

Things may not always go as expected, especially in Matyskiel’s case, but everything happens for a reason. After all, Matyskiel would not be at Park Vista if things went as she had  planned.

 

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Ennis-Dillon, spectacular teacher

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“A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning,” – Brad Henry, former Governor of Oklahoma.

Karen Ennis-Dillon, a Spanish teacher at Park Vista High School, does just that. Born in Spalding, Clarendon, Jamaica, Ennis-Dillon worked hard in school so she could prosper in life. She was a star-athlete in high school and also represented her language skills on a Spanish quiz team that competed against other schools in Jamaica. She played on her school’s netball, track and field and long jump teams. In addition, during her free time, she would play volleyball and baseball with friends, sing and dance for fun. Church played a big role in her early life, too. She would join and lead activities for youth groups there. Ennis-Dillon said her experience at the church helped her greatly in life by teaching her public speaking skills and leading groups which, unbeknownst to her, she would use a great deal in her later life.

Ennis-Dillon’s aspiration to become a teacher was sparked by a few key people. Her high school teacher Mr. Ashley, whom she had from 8th to 11th grade, taught her Spanish and life lessons. Similarly, Mr. Bowen, her math teacher, indirectly taught her life lessons about effectively teaching students and helping them as much as possible. She attended teacher’s college, Church Teachers College, in Mandeville, Jamaica and earned her credentials to teach  Spanish and English a the secondary level. She first taught at Knox College, in Jamaica for a few years which she said was one of the best teaching experiences she ever had. Then, at the University of the West Indies (U.W.I.), Mona, Jamaica, her lecturer Dr. Susan Anderson, who taught her some courses for her Master’s (M.Ed) and Bachelor’s (B.Ed) degrees sealed the thought in Ennis-Dillon’s mind to become a teacher. She graduated with a B.Ed with Honors in Spanish Education and a M.Ed with Distinction in Educational Psychology from the U.W.I.

After teaching in Jamaica for a number of years, Ennis-Dillon moved to the U.S. when she was 31 and began teaching here. She taught at a charter school for teens before joining Park Vista’s staff.  Now she has two sons, Antonio, 4, and Nicolas, 2, who according to Ennis-Dillon, are like her in many ways. They love to laugh, play board games, read, run, and ask questions, many traits which she had as a kid and has kept throughout her whole life. She takes her two sons to the YMCA weekly and to parks, malls and church often.  They speak Spanish at home and Antonio now knows English, and is on his way to becoming bilingual.

Having worked diligently, Ennis-Dillon has done well in life. Having relocated to the U.S permanently, her children, Antonio and Nicolas who were both born here, may now have better opportunities than she had in Jamaica, including possibly obtaining more scholarships and better jobs. Although they may not encounter the same challenges Ennis-Dillon did in Jamaica, other hardships may impact them in America, such as racism and prejudice. Yet, she is hopeful that her children will accomplish their goals in life and feels that her experiences throughout life will help them in theirs. Ennis-Dillon, the loving mother of two, said, “Have faith in God, work hard, and you can accomplish great things. And if you have children, love them with all your heart.”

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Baby Cobras!

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Congratulations to Dr. Pierre and Mrs. McDonough on having a new baby boy and baby girl on the way! Wishing your soon-to-be newborns many years of good health, love and happiness. Congratulations from The Cobra Chronicle Staff.

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Employee Spotlight on Edguardo

Noah Fogel (STUDENT)

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A huge Cobra shoutout to the Employee of the Week here at PVCHS Edguardo!

This week Park Vista’s Employee Spotlight is on our all-star custodian, Edguardo. You will find Edguardo all over campus each morning preparing the school for the day’s activities. From setting up to cleaning up, Edguardo does it all! Thanks Edguardo for making Park Vista shine!

 

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Congratulations, Mr. Semmelmeier!

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A NASA image on a possible project for a Mars transportation helicopter.

A NASA image on a possible project for a Mars transportation helicopter.

A NASA image on a possible project for a Mars transportation helicopter.

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Congratulations!  Mr. Semmelmeier has been chosen as a teacher to participate in the NASA I.M.E.E.T. (Innovative Mars Exploration Education and Technology) summer camp from June 5 – 16, 2017.  NASA IMEET Camp is a summer outreach program sponsored by the NASA aimed to provide students an immersive two-week long experience in NASA’s Journey to Mars and its Technologies. Students not only learn the history and future missions of NASA’s Journey to Mars program, they also get an opportunity to learn from and interact with camp instructors from Georgia Tech. This is a huge honor for Park Vista and we congratulate Mr. Semmelmeier again!

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Rebecca Lobasz, Park Vista’s newest addition

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Lobasz poses with her fiance, Brian.

Lobasz poses with her fiance, Brian.

Lobasz poses with her fiance, Brian.

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“If there’s one job that the nation will benefit most from, it’s that of a teacher. They educate the children of the future; it’s not an easy job, but Ms. Lobasz is an amazing teacher and I’m glad to have her,” said sophomore (and psychology student) Cameron Santiago.

“The most difficult thing about teaching is probably grading papers. That and time management, but I don’t come here to grade papers and to make lessons. I come here to see you guys! I love to hear my students’ stories and see my them everyday. It’s what makes teaching worth it,” Lobasz said. Currently, she is wrapping up her first year of teaching at Park Vista and is looking forward to many more years like it.

Before teaching at PV, Lobasz worked at a Laser Tag Arena called ‘Hard Knocks’, Staples Office Supply and a real estate company for five years while in graduate school. However, the requirements for becoming a psychology teacher demanded a lot from Lobasz. She had to pass a state test for social science, obtain her Bachelor’s Degree in psychology and receive her Master’s Degree. Altogether, her schooling took a total of five years.

“My career goals?” Lobasz said as the question arose, “I’ve achieved them. I work for the best school in Palm Beach County. Ten years from now? I still see myself teaching here.”

Lobasz hopes to someday receive her Master’s Degree in educational leadership and she also plans to send children of her own to college in hopes that they will become successful adults.

Of course, there is more to a teacher than just teaching. Outside of the work environment, Lobasz finds herself taking up “whatever activities that the great outdoors can provide.” Fishing and boating are just some of the outdoor activities she enjoys. In addition, Lobasz said that she absolutely loves going out on the ocean with her fiancé, Brian. The first time she and her fiance took their new boat out on the water was one of the most memorable moments of her life- but probably not for the best reason. “Brian told me to drive while he rigged up the poles and I just blanked and almost crashed the boat,” Lobasz said. Needless to say, Brian is still hesitant when it comes to Lobasz taking the wheel.

Growing up, Lobasz did ballet for 13 years and played soccer for seven. “I loved the stage and being able to perform amazing choreography. My soccer coaches also impacted my life in such a positive way. They helped guide me through school through tough decisions,” Lobasz said.

Aside from teaching, spending time with her fiancé and enjoying outdoor activities, Lobasz loves to travel. She once went to Paris with her mother and a friend during Christmas break in the eighth grade. They went to the Louvre Museum, climbed the Eiffel Tower and ended up getting pick-pocketed by some children who stole her mother’s wallet. Despite her crazy, yet exciting, experiences, she is still keen on traveling the world, and Paris was definitely a trip she will always remember.

Lobasz’s next trip is going to be to Poland with her fiancé and her father (who is Polish and speaks Polish fluently). Lobasz has family in Poland that she has never met before and she thinks that it would be “amazing to see the country where her father grew up especially from a native’s viewpoint.”

In addition to her travels, one of her most memorable experiences was the day she received the best gift of her life. “The most exciting story from my childhood was the day I got my first car,” said Lobasz. It was a red, 2004 Mustang that she drove around whenever she had the chance. The most embarrassing memory, ironically, happened to involve the same vehicle that she loved so dearly. “I was late for school and they had locked the gate. I had to back up down a narrow street and crashed right into the guard railing. Not only did I have to call my mom because I was late, but I also had to inform her that I had crushed my bumper.”

Like many, Lobasz has had a crazy childhood with many ups and downs, but above all, she takes education very seriously. Following in her mother’s footsteps, she teaches Psychology with an undying passion. She knows that students today face pressures that most people her age would easily crumple under.

“They’re held to high standards by parents and teachers alike. They’ve got jobs and friends and juggling a social life between the two is difficult,” Lobasz said in regards to being a teacher.

She encourages her students to do as she did, and find a job that you not only like, but love. “A job that you love never feels like work, and getting up everyday for a job that you hate, or even like, is hard,” said Lobasz, She loves what she does, and knows that teaching is what she wants to do for the rest of her life.

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400 mile OPD walk: Bryan Galvin’s journey

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Oceanic Plastic Discharge (OPD): At first glance, to any ordinary person, these three words seem to hold trivial meaning, while in reality they possess a hidden story with a significant moral. However, to Bryan Galvin, a local resident, 26-year-old surfer, lifeguard and avid OPD awareness member, these words mean so much more. In order to combat the rising issue of OPD, Bryan decided to plan a 400-mile back-packing walk in order to raise awareness.

OPD, commonly referred to as marine pollution, occurs when harmful, or potentially harmful, effects result from the entry into the ocean of chemicals, particles, industrial, agricultural and residential waste, noise or the spread of invasive inorganic material.

The United Nations Environment Program estimated in 2006, that every square mile of ocean contains 46,000 pieces of floating plastic. With the constantly advancing technology and increasing production rates, it can only be predicted that these numbers are peeking in today’s society. If that is not shocking enough, plastic debris causes the deaths of more than a million seabirds every year, as well as more than 100,000 marine mammals.

“Being involved in the issues you feel strongly about are how movements of the political system happen. Another great idea would be to gather petition signatures for the abolishment of single use bags,” said AICE Environmental Management teacher, Mrs. Dublin.

Galvin’s experience began in his early life when he received his own surfboard at 16 years old and developed his passion for the ocean. He has also been a lifeguard for about five years and a lifeguard instructor for about two years.

“The beach has been a huge part of my life, so has the surf. Being out in the ocean in the surf feels like a whole different world where you can have a clear mind with no distractions,” said Galvin.

The walk will begin at Fernandina Beach, FL and stretch a total of 400 miles along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean to South Beach Miami, FL. The walk will take 20 days and will begin on April 17 and end on May 6. People from across Florida are invited to not only donate to the cause but participate in the walk by relieving their local beaches of OPD.

“During my journey, I will be picking up all OPD materials that cross my path. Along the way, I will be posting video blogs and journal entries, along with live video feeds that anyone will be able to access. I will also have my surfboard with me of course, surfing when and where I can,” said Galvin.

The live-video stream will be one of the most prominent factors of the walk, especially on day one. On day one of the journey, Bryan will be greeting each of his backers in his first live broadcast, as well as explaining the walk and where he intends to be on the broadcast. He also plans to report anything bizarre or out of the ordinary through a video or written blog and upload daily so that viewers can comment and share. It is predicted that two live broadcasts will occur each day, once during the walk so that people can tune in with him while he walks and another at the end of the day to update everyone on the journey thus far.

When asked about the purpose behind the walk, Galvin said, “I wish I could answer that question with to solve the problem, but it won’t. This walk is about examining and showing the world the symptom of OPD which is the result of irresponsible human activity. The purpose is to bring consciousness. Even immediate people around me do not fully grasp the impact that their daily purchases may have on the world.”

There are many ways that local residents can support the movement including accessing Kickstarter at: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/660693281/plastic-awareness-beach-hike-eastern-florida-shore?ref=email. Bryan hopes to fully fund the journey on his own, which proves to be difficult in today’s economy. The support would go towards supplies for the journey including water, fuel, food and burlap bags. Bryan invites anyone that has the time to grab a burlap (no plastic bags) and become part of his journey as he passes through local beaches.

“Seeing somebody follow through on a position that they really feel passionately about is really inspiring and exciting to me,” said senior, Lenny Mecca. “I will definitely be tuning into some of the live-video streams to learn more about the issue and the walk.”

Rewards will also be distributed to people who donate and support the cause. Surfing lessons (private, semi-private and group) will be offered, three live open discussions through a live internet broadcast, stickers, pieces of OPD with specialized markings, sea glass and most importantly, respect of the ocean and the planet.

“We can all do our part by refusing irresponsible single use plastics. Most of the time I find that the most conscious products that are not only consciously produced but good for your body, usually have little to no single use plastic in their packaging. Take a look for yourself, you don’t have to take my word for it,” said Galvin.

 

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Truth about lying

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From the time children learn to talk, they are constantly reminded not to lie. The irony is that many parents are lying to them about Santa Claus and the tooth fairy. As children grow older, they notice friends may lie and tell each other they “look great in that outfit” or “those jeans are very flattering” When is it acceptable to lie? And why do people continue to do it?

Appearance

The competition between men makes some feel they need to be the best (or at least better than their friends and acquaintances), which can lead to lying. For instance, some men may lie about the weight they lift to impress a girl or get their attention.

“One time my boy at University of Central Florida (UCF) told all his friends he could lift 300 lbs. but when we went to the gym he could only lift 180 lbs” said Mr. Ryan Placido. This is just one example of the many ways men can lie to try to impress others by their athletic ability.

Men are not the only ones that lie about their appearance, women do also, however, to a study by the Science Museum of London, women are 75 percent more likely to lie to save someone else’s self-esteem than men. When a woman asks another women, “Do these jeans make my butt look big?” the she will most likely respond with the answer they know the woman wants to hear. Even if it is not the truth, they will lie about it to make the person feel good.

Some people, afraid of what might happen if they told the truth, do not even try to be honest. Maybe they have done something wrong and are afraid of the consequences of their actions, so they lie to cover up what they did. When people lie, not only are they affecting themselves, but they are losing the trust of the people they lie to.

 

Self-Protection

Many people lie in order to protect themselves from an unpleasant situation or any type of conflict. For instance, young children lie to ensure they do not get into trouble. Children and adults lie to avoid consequences or punishment. In some cases, lying could protect someone from having to face the fact that what he or she did was wrong, and in some cases, make the situation worse. Others may lie when they feel attacked by someone through words. If someone confronts another person about an issue, people may lie to end the conversation.

“I have met people that have straight-up lied to me about something they did to hurt someone else. I knew they were lying, so I had to stop myself from being close with them so I didn’t risk getting lied to also,” said junior Mason Medina.

Even though we frown upon people lying, some people cannot help but to lie. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) can cause patients to have extreme reactions, unstable relationships and spontaneous emotional behavior. When someone with this disorder feels threatened or personally violated, his or her first reaction is to lie. The people that have this disorder think their behavior is normal, even though it can make them less sociable.

Financial Status

Some may lie to show financial gain, make others feel sorry for them, or sometimes try to play the victim in a situation. Most people want to make others think they have a lot of money, even though they may not. Some may buy more high-end accessories or clothing to replicate a higher status, which they might not have.

Not only do people buy high end accessories and clothing, but they may also rent furniture for an event to appear wealthier than they really are. Websites like www.afrevents.com and www.cortevents.com allow users to design a space online. Then they send the furnishings to their house. Both of these companies will go to a customer’s house and replace all of his or her furniture with the furniture they chose to rent. At the end of the event, they will come back and put back all the old furniture.

“Some people lie about their financial status because they are scared others will judge them for the amount of money they make, or if they tell their friends and family how much they make, they might take advantage of them,” said sophomore Catherine Stracci.

Manipulation

Many people may also lie to manipulate others, attempting to get them to do something for them. Not only does manipulation affect the person being lied to, but it affects the person who is lying. When someone asks another person to do a task, this person may feel pressured into doing it, leading them to do it. The person lying might think it is okay to keep manipulating others for their own good.

If someone being lied to were to pick up on that fact, they might unfriend the person. If this were to happen, it may cause a bigger ordeal than if the person did not lie in the first place. When people are afraid of what might happen if they told the truth, they do not even try to be honest. They may have done something wrong and are afraid of the consequences of their actions, so they lie to cover up what they did. When people lie, not only are they affecting themselves, but they are losing the trust of the people they lie to.

“I have had friends make me do something for them, but they make it seem like I must do it for my well-being even though its’s for them. For example, someone told me I had to make a poster for a project, but they didn’t want to do and they just put their name on it,” said senior Nicholas Sanchez.

In the end, does lying really make our lives easier? In the end telling the truth from the beginning could alleviate the pressure of lying and prevent a much worse situation from developing.

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  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Model UN: lesser-known club

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

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    Mayor for a Day

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Matyskiel’s history

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Ennis-Dillon, spectacular teacher

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Baby Cobras!

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

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    Employee Spotlight on Edguardo

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Congratulations, Mr. Semmelmeier!

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Rebecca Lobasz, Park Vista’s newest addition

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    400 mile OPD walk: Bryan Galvin’s journey

  • MSD Walkout Memorial

    Features

    Truth about lying

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